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Travis is the name of a neighborhood at the west-central edge of Staten Island.  Some local geographers classify its location as being on the island's West Shore, while others claim it is a Mid-Island neighborhood.

Located north of the Fresh Kills along the shoreline of the Arthur Kill, Travis is one of the most isolated and sparsely-populated locales on Staten Island. Known at times as Long Neck and New Blazing Star Ferry,  it became the site of the USA's first linoleum factory in the 1860s, leading to its being named Linoleumville; however, in 1930, residents overwhelmingly chose to rename the community after Colonel Jacob Travis, whose family had resided there before the linoleum plant opened.

The western terminus of Victory Boulevard, a major thoroughfare on Staten Island, is at Travis. Established in 1816 by Daniel D. Tompkins as the Richmond Turnpike, this road was "promoted as the fastest route from New York to Philadelphia."  On this road, bus service along the Island's North Shore to the St. George Ferry Terminal is provided by the S62 route. A ferry across the Arthur Kill linked Travis with Carteret, New Jersey. It stopped running in 1929. However, a "people only" ferry did remain in operation until the mid 1960's.

Travis is noted throughout Staten Island for the colorful Independence Day parade held there annually. Many members of the community's founding families are buried in Sylvan Grove Cemetery, a small, triangle-shaped burial ground near the junction of Victory Boulevard and the West Shore Expressway, which has fallen into severe disarray, mostly due to vandalism.

 Travis has one of the last volunteer fire houses in the city, and second on Staten Island, Oceanic Engine 1. Oceanic was formed in 1881. This makes it one of the oldest volunteer fire houses in the country. The actual fire house itself was located on the other side of town and moved down Victory Blvd. by horse to where it resides today.

Even with this building boom, Travis has retained many of its characteristics that made it the last frontier on Staten Island. Still standing is the old Tennyson's confectionery . It now is a balloon and party store, but this once held a penny candy store that was operational for almost one hundred years. This is located across from the Oceanic Hook and Ladder firehouse and was a popular hang out for the town locals, and firemen. Owned by "Snappy" Ed Tennyson, called that because he moved so slow, was handed down to his son in law, Robert Minto Jr. who ran the store just about up to his death in 1986.


               Courtesy of Ron Spooner. Travis' own Milkman Bill Spooner (Ron's Dad) on his daily delivery route. 

 


Oceanic H & L No 1

 


PS 26 kids marching in a July 4th parade


The Travis Airport was located where Glen Street met with Victory Blvd.
up until it closed in the early 1950's.

 

Travis hosts a July 4th parade each year which is now into its 98th year, one of the oldest in the nation
 

 

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This site was last updated 04/18/10

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